Suspended slab

The latest milestone in the construction of our House By The Water is the suspended slab.  Before you get excited, there is nothing fancy about a “suspended slab” – it just means it is not on the ground,  it spans the space between the walls.   But if you would like to get excited or astounded by the amount of steel reinforcements and electrical conduits that go into a slab, go right ahead.  I am rather amazed myself.

This network of electrical conduits and steel is now hidden in our concrete slab.

This network of electrical conduits and steel is now hidden in our concrete slab.

The heat in Western Australia last week was rather extreme.  Our slab pour was postponed a couple of days in an attempt to pour the concrete in lower temperatures.

Suspended slab

The suspended slab looking a bit spotty from some rain.

Thanks to our Site Supervisor from Webb and Brown-Neaves for the photos.

A guided tour for my Mum:Slab with floor plan.

Because we like pretty things on House By The Water, and maybe, like me, you don’t think our new concrete is quite in the “pretty” category, let me show you some good-looking concrete.

concrete floor

Beautiful concrete. Happy Laugh’s vision for her farmhouse. Source: Norm Architecture.

One of my favourite home-building bloggers, Happy Laughs, has finally arrived at the fun part of home building.  Happy Laughs and her family live on a farm in Texas and have become “owner-builders” late in the process of their build.  They are fully in charge of the finishings for their huge barn.  It’s tricky to describe the style of their house.  They’ve used gigantic reclaimed wood beams and have an unstained concrete floor but to call it rustic would not do it justice.  Happy Laughs likes country style but with some Scandanavian, industrial and modern influences.  How about that for a combination?  Check out her amazing chandelier, incredible fire place and gorgeous ceilings for yourself on Happy Laugh’s blog:  happylaughs.wordpress.com

Farm house

Happy Laugh’s farm house is nearing the end of construction.

If you are on Instagram you can see Happy Laugh’s new house and her little cowboys and cowgirls enjoying the farm at: instagram.com/happylaughs6

And, if you haven’t found me on Instagram yet, I’m here: instagram.com/housebythewater

Gallery

Farmhouse tour.

 

Photo by Matt Rex.

Photo by Matt Rex.


Come and have a sticky beak at my Mum and Dad’s farm house in frosty North-East Victoria.  They started with a 2 bedroom shack beside a small walnut grove and a few paddocks for cows.

Ten years ago, with the help of local builder, Rob Boland, they extended the living areas and bathroom and added a bedroom, to create an interesting, light and open, modern home.  The house features 3 separate roofs and exterior wall cladding in Colorbond “ironstone” corrugated iron.

3 Roofs

Front Entrance.

Front Entrance.

Deck for cuppas.

Deck for cuppas.

Should you drop by, you can be sure of a cup of tea and some home baked goodies on the deck, followed by a garden tour.

Kitchen:

Tasmanian Oak Kitchen Island and Alpine Ash floors salvaged from bush fires.

“Tasmanian Oak” kitchen bench tops and Alpine Ash floors salvaged from bush fires.

When I’m visiting, I often take over Mum’s kitchen while she takes over supervision of the 3 little pigs.  This kitchen has been the hub for years of entertaining a large extended family and has served as my benchmark for sizing up the kitchen in House By The Water.  You might remember that this is my “gold standard” for kitchen bench size.

Living area:

An atrium above the kitchen keeps the living area light at any time of day.

An atrium above the kitchen keeps the living area light at any time of day.

Dining room:

My Dad made the dining table when Mum was pregnant with me.  That’s an estimated 14600 family dinners!  When the clouds lift, Mount Feathertop is at the centre of the dining room view.

Master bedroom:

The pitched ceiling is lined with corrugated iron which gives a nice sense of space and a farm house touch.  The bed is centred in the room so you can check on the cows in the morning without getting out of bed.

Bathroom:

Bath with a view, if the neighbours aren't home.

Bath with a view, if the neighbours aren’t home.

Laundry:

The laundry was originally a small shed, a couple of metres away from the back door of the house.  It doubles as the farm control centre, also housing the electric fence unit, chook pellets and an impressive gumboot collection.

Mum's ergonomically designed laundry trolly.  She pushes the wet laundry up the nearby hill to the old Hill's Hoist.

Mum’s ergonomically designed laundry trolly. She pushes the wet laundry up the nearby hill to the old Hill’s Hoist.

Right now the wood fire is roaring in the living room and the house is busy with grandchildren.  Toys and games are everywhere.  The kids will be outside soon to help with some farm jobs.  Dad is “up the back” renovating his tractor shed.  Mum is in the shower, but I think I’ll have another cuppa and wait for the bathroom to warm up another degree or two.

Header photo and photos in the last gallery are thanks to Matt Rex Photo.