Becoming a film star and testing the pool.

Interview.As life becomes more hectic and posts are more distant, there’s rather a lot to catch up on.  House By The Water made its film debut.  Out of respect for the job well done by our builders, Webb and Brown-Neaves, I agreed to host an interview about our building experience.  There were conditions, of course.  Firstly, the filming would be confined to the part of the house that I could guarantee to be tidy given the habits of the Three Little Pigs.   Secondly, I would do my best to make House By The Water look stylish, if the builder’s marketing team could do something about making me photogenic.Builder's movie

It was a fun morning.  It was the longest make-up session that I have ever endured, much to the amusement of the Three Little Pigs.  Reneé, from WBN, did an excellent job of being a temporary TV journalist and Troy was cool and calm behind the cameras, trying his best to keep me relaxed without involving alcohol.

I made a last minute attempt to purchase a new floor rug for the living room, but fell for the rug that was “out of stock”.  Fortunately, Dee from Frisky Deer Interiors, stepped in with the loan of a luxurious Armadillo and Co rug for the video shoot.  It looked very good at House By The Water and I secretly hoped that tea/wine would be spilt on it and we’d have to buy it.

Living room.

Looking like a film star, but the rug has seen better days.

I may or may not let you all know when the video is published.

Enough stardom, onto the pool.

The landscapers are almost finished.  There are just a few finishing touches left in their scope (and years of work left in ours).  The pool was filled and commissioned and despite the weather still behaving like Winter we decided to “bugger it”!  We heated up the pool for one weekend and let the Little Pigs in for a wallow.Pool.

First swim in the pool.

Happy as a pig in pool.

I finally committed to an olive tree beside the pool.   Though young, it’s already a feature, looking especially lovely lit up at night:Olive Tree

The canal side landscaping is finally starting to come together.  It shall be ready for the Christmas visitors and the throngs of tourists boating passed lured by Christmas lights.

 

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Weather testing the house.

Floating jetty.

Today we walk up the ramp to stand on our floating jetty.  The neighbours’ fixed jetty (far right) is submerged.

We only just got to the barbecue as it was rolling towards the edge of the open deck, propelled by wind.  The kayaks were about to set sail, unmanned, as the storm surge lapped over the edges of the canal walls.  The pool is being filled, a kind of icky green colour.  The hail has just stopped.  Banging doors kept us awake half the night, but there are no puddles on our floors, nor water stains on our ceilings so I’m pronouncing the weather testing a success.  We are fast approaching the end of our 6 month maintenance period and need to finalise our list of items to be fixed by our builders, Webb and Brown-Neaves, so the timing of the lousy weather is rather good.

Flooded garden

Wading through the bottom level of our canal-side yard. Current landscaping project.

Plus, nothing beats a good storm for providing a legitimate excuse for a day off shovelling, or whatever other landscaping task I should be doing.  Time, instead, to blog.

What’s new?  Shutters!  Actually they’ve been in a few weeks now and I’ve been waiting in the vain hope that one of the Three Little Pigs might have a bedroom tidy enough for a blogworthy photograph.  The bedrooms and library all have shutters and are all rooms that are low priority works-in-progress.  So I’m going with a couple of “keeping it real” photos for you.

Bedroom shutters.

New shutters in sty number 2, on a good day.

Library shutters.

Library shutters. (Disclaimer: the pigs are not usually this perfect.)

The shutters look good from the exterior too, but today is just not the day to prove it to you.

I have a couple of new rugs.  One of the problems I didn’t fully anticipate with our house design is the poor acoustics.  The void space over the living area allows an echo to bounce all over our open living space, not good for conversation once we have a few guests over.   I thought we needed some more soft furnishings to absorb some noise.  Enter rug addition number 1:

Sanna rug, Freedom.

Sanna rug, Freedom.

I didn’t want to spend too much on a rug for the dining room, it’ll probably only last a year or two under our dining table.  I picked a wool blend rug from Freedom, with enough colour in it so that I don’t cry the first time it cops a bowl of spaghetti bolognese.  The weave is thin enough to vacuum the crumbs easily and thick enough to absorb some noise.  I think it has helped and I must say it’s nice under my feet on cold mornings.

Rug addition number two is multi-purpose.

Armadillo and Co rug.

Armadillo and Co. hemp runner.

It is to catch any stray hot embers that fall out of the wood fire when we stoke it, to protect our timber floor.  I needed something that could disguise any soot marks and preferably something with some fire retardancy.  I hoped for wool but couldn’t find anything the right size.  This Armadillo and Co. runner is hemp.  When the fire is not going, the rug doubles as a door mat between our deck and the living room.

There has been a touch of landscaping progress.  I visited the Perth Garden Festival, where there were a couple of inspiring exhibits.  The good bits:

I came home with 21 kangaroo paws in tubes.  21 wheelbarrow loads of dirt and two weeks later the kangaroo paws are all planted and enjoying the rainy weather.kangaroo paws

The professional landscapers have completed their day of work for the month, so I’m guessing I won’t see them again now until June.

Most exciting is that I received a present that my husband gave me for a certain conspicuous birthday.  My big art.  It’s an indigenous dot painting by artist Margaret Lewis Napangardi.  I said “wow” the first time I saw this painting in Japingka Gallery‘s window.  Now it’s in our living room and I love it!

Mina Mina Jukurrpa

Mina Mina Jukurrpa, by Margaret Lewis Napangardi

Mina Mina at House By The Water.

Love it!

 

2015 – The year of the house

I’m very excited about 2015.  It’s the year we’re going to have a house. I feel spoiled rotten to be able to say that.

We are going to go from this:

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“Plate high” in December.

 

to this:

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The grand plan for “House by the Water”. Image by Tim Davies Landscaping.

It’s not just about having walls and a roof of our own, it’s about having a home where we can stay put a while and develop roots.  I’m excited that my children will be able to have that as they approach their teenage years.

But before I get too sentimental, let me tell you about activity on our house in December.

  • The bricklayers reached “plate high”, meaning that the ground floor brickwork is complete.
  • The laundry and powder room floor tiles and splash back tiles that I selected almost one year ago have been discontinued.  I’m embracing the reselection process as an opportunity!  (There’s potential for a third blog post about splash backs, going for a blogging world record.)
  • The oven and microwave I selected are also discontinued, but happily not much brain power was required to accept their replacements.
  • I received our first “construction schedule”.  I’m very pleased with this, mostly because it gives me a good idea about all the tasks that need to be done and the order, but also because it matches my idea of timing for the house to be complete.  Readers who picked early October in the Guess the handover date competition, it’s looking good for you!
  • I purchased our fireplace and it arrived it Perth, bringing with it my first taste of the hassles associated with “owner-supplied items”.  The vendor will only store it for 60 days, but the builders will not have the house ready for it until later.  Problem 1:  storage.  Problem 2: getting it to the building site once the builders are ready.  Problem 3:  neither the vendor nor our builders will install it.  Problem 4:  amateur hack trying to co-ordinate multiple parties from afar.  (That’s me.)

And on a fluffier note, I’m still basking in the sunshine that was our holiday to Peru.  Every moment was fascinating. It was such a surprise to not only be blown away by amazing views, but also by the freshness and colour of everyday life, especially in the rural areas.  The people were friendly and the food was healthy, innovative and delicious.  It’s hard to fathom that an existence so different to our life in Brazil lies within the same continent.  My girls had a marvellous time purchasing cheap textile gifts from the markets and we bought a beautiful throw and a floor rug to remember the local alpacas and talented weavers.

Rugs

The house slab isn’t down but already I’m thinking about rugs.  I want to be ready for the moment when I find THE rug.  I like to see and feel a rug before I buy it and the right rug may pop up while I’m traveling.  There may be no going back to get it later…

With the exception of the bathrooms and laundry, our floors will be blackbutt timber.  We’ll need plenty of rugs eventually but, for now, the main rug of concern is for the living area.  There are various opinions about how large a rug should be in relation to a room and “rules” about sofa feet being on or off the rug, but I’ve noticed that some of the most stylish of rooms don’t follow the rules.

Picture Sources:  1. Desire To Inspire 2. April and May 3. West Elm 4. Domaine Home.

Size.

For our living room, I’m subscribing to the “large makes the room look large” theory.  At a minimum I want the rug to sit under the front feet of the sofa.  At a maximum, I want to leave  20-30cm from the walls, so you can still appreciate the timber floors and to keep the rug clear of ash that might fall out of the fireplace.  I used Jardan’s room planner to map out the likely location and size of our dream sofa in our living room.  From this I took the measurements for the rug.

Each small square is 20cm square.

Each small square is 20cm square.

Maximum size 3.5x 3.4m.  Minimum size 3 x 2.2 m.  Big.

However, if I was to fall in love with a rug outside these dimensions, then I think it could be done.  Many off-the-shelf rugs do not come large enough to fit my requirements.

Style.

I’m wavering between a rug with a pattern and a small pallet of colours or something neutral and unicoloured but with lots of texture.  Here are a few of my favourites:

Patterned:

Softly patterned rugs

Sources:  1- 3: Jenny Jones Rugs. 4: Sanderson Home Rug at Yarn and Loom.  5:  West Elm.  6: Designers Guild.

Geometric rugs

Sources:  7 & 8:  Armadillo&Co.  9.  West Elm.

Unicoloured.

Natural rugs

Sources: 10-12:  West Elm.  13: WorldWeave.  14 & 15: Freedom Furniture.

Right now, pattern is winning.   The sofa will be plain, so some pattern won’t go astray.

Material.

  • Cotton/thread  ✔    I’m a sucker for a good kilim.
  • Jute ✔
  • Silk or a silk blend.✔  So nice under foot.
  • Wool ✔  Sometimes.  I have a great wool rug from Freedom that is at least 10 years old and has been very resilient to herds of wild children and questionable house keeping.  But some wool rugs look like they need a good shear.  They are a bit fluffy and shed!  A few rugs that I recently saw at Pottery Barn fell into this category.

If THE rug doesn’t find me, here are my

go to places for big rugs:

Under $1000

  • Freedom  (Max size: 2.5 x 3.5 m)
  • West Elm  (Max size: 2.74 x 3.66 m)
  • WorldWeave (Max off-the-shelf size 2 x 3 m, custom available.)

 Under $3000

Armadillo & Co - Twine rugs

Which rug do you like best?  Are you eyeing off an alternative?  Have I missed any secret rug shops?  You know, I usually like to consider Australian made options, but I couldn’t find one I like under $1000, not even under $3000.

If you are still not overloaded by rugs, you’ll find more in my Pinterest file.