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Farmhouse tour.

Fancy a “Tree Change”? I’m reposting this story I wrote 2 years ago about my Mum and Dad’s special farmhouse because it’s for sale. Located near Mount Beauty, it’s just 30 km to the snow fields of Falls Creek and a short drive to the vineyards and gourmet food trails of North-East Victoria. For more information and any enquiries, you can call my Mum, Joan, on 0431700921.

House by the water.

Photo by Matt Rex. Photo by Matt Rex.


Come and have a sticky beak at my Mum and Dad’s farm house in frosty North-East Victoria.  They started with a 2 bedroom shack beside a small walnut grove and a few paddocks for cows.

Ten years ago, with the help of local builder, Rob Boland, they extended the living areas and bathroom and added a bedroom, to create an interesting, light and open, modern home.  The house features 3 separate roofs and exterior wall cladding in Colorbond “ironstone” corrugated iron.

3 Roofs

Front Entrance. Front Entrance.

Deck for cuppas. Deck for cuppas.

Should you drop by, you can be sure of a cup of tea and some home baked goodies on the deck, followed by a garden tour.

Kitchen:

Tasmanian Oak Kitchen Island and Alpine Ash floors salvaged from bush fires. “Tasmanian Oak” kitchen bench tops and Alpine Ash floors salvaged from bush fires.

When I’m visiting, I often take over Mum’s kitchen while she takes over supervision of the 3 little pigs.  This…

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Living room.
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Building update. With my very own eyes.

So, we may have made a short visit to House By The Water at half past midnight, upon our arrival in Mandurah.  And it’s quite possible that we are averaging 3 site visits per day this week.  We are a tad excited.  We have a lot to catch up on and so do the builders.  The new construction plan is all go go go, aiming for handover before Christmas.

Here is the promised tour:

Front facade

Front facade

Entrance

Entrance

Garage

Garage

Stairs

Stairs and hallway.

Entrance

Entrance void

Library

Library.

Living room.

Living room.

Kitchen

Looking towards the kitchen from the living room.

Master bedroom

Our bedroom.

WIR

Through the walk-in-robe to the bathroom.

Ensuite

Ensuite

Looking down into the living room.

Looking down into the living room.

Bedroom

The Second Little Pig’s bedroom.

Open living area.

Open living.

3 little pigs

The Three Little Pigs, squinting to preserve their anonymity.

Man hole

The Nice Wolf inspecting the man hole. I think it fits.

I added the above photos to this post this morning, but by my second visit to the site this afternoon more ceilings had been plastered and lots of the scaffolding was removed.  Woohoo!  So now you can really see the size of the living area, including the living room void and alfresco area which looks especially huge.

Canal side aspect of the house.

Canal side aspect.

Alfresco

Double height alfresco area.

Open living area.

Plastered ceiling, dining room

Plastered ceilings ground floor.

Plastered ceilings ground floor.

And for this week’s style dilemma, the stack stone that I selected almost 2 years ago for the feature column on the front facade is currently unavailable, so I needed to reselect.  I checked the options online and made a tentative selection, but for $14K worth of stone and the labour to install it, I thought it wise to see a sample.  Midland Brick in Mandurah stock Boral’s stone cladding and I went to inspect.  I’m so glad I did because the colours of the stone on my computer screen were completely different to the real samples.  That made me nervous so I decided to take a short list of samples around to the house for testing:

Online “Aspen” (left) was my first choice, but in reality there was too much orange.  So Echo Ridge (middle) and White Oak (right) were the last two contenders.  I’ve selected Echo Ridge, wanting a bit of dark contrast to the rest of our light grey pallet to break up the front facade with texture and colour.  My Mum (starring in the photos) likes White Oak the best which is very beachy, but slightly off my colour pallet of greys.

Ledgestone

Oral “country ledgestone” in White Oak, Echo Ridge and Aspen.

That’s all for now.  My head is still a bit rattled by jet lag, too much excitement and a hectic week.

Vegetable garden
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Veggie Patch

All good Easter Bunnies need a vegetable patch, so I thought it was a good time to tackle the topic of growing vegetables.  Well, I bit off more than I could chew,  so consider this Part One.

Let’s start with the easy bit.  Some inspiration.

Wood planters.  Source:  Remodelista.

Wood planters. Source: Remodelista.

Photo by Anna Fasth at  Tradgards Design.

Photo by Anna Fasth at Tradgards Design.

Concrete kitchen garden.  Photo source:  Skarp Agent (unverified).

Concrete kitchen garden. Photo source: Skarp Agent (unverified).

Source:  Style Room

Source: Style Room

(Header photo source:  Victoria Skoglund.)

Good looking, hey?  Looks are important because our vegetable garden is going in our front yard.  I like the simplicity of several black boxes in a row, but I’d also like to soften the look of the front yard so gardens with varying heights and angles appeal to me too.  There are plenty more swish vegetable gardens to see in my Pinterest file.

I’ve grown herbs and a few veggies before but on a very small scale.  The more I read, the more I go round in circles considering aspect, soil, garden bed material, climate, pests and even who’s friends with who in the vegetable world.  So I’ve narrowed my plan of attack down to these three options:

  1. Continue to study up and plan a technically correct vegetable garden.
  2. Bribe my Dad with an airfare, give him a budget and let him loose in my front yard.
  3. Wing it.

I’m currently favouring the last option.  In the mean time, here are a few resources that I’ve found interesting:

  1. Yates – my hard copy of Yates Garden Guide is in storage, so I had to resort to the web.  This site has a lot of Australian based information.  I signed up to trial their virtual garden, but it lacks the detail to be useful.
  2. Garden Angels – How to Grow Your Own Vegetables video series.  These cheerful and short videos start right from the basics of building your own garden bed.
  3. Online Garden Planner.  The trial version is free.  You can map out your garden space, getting an idea of scale.
My veggie plan as drawn on  the Online Planner:  work in progress.

My veggie plan as drawn on the Online Garden Planner: work in progress.

And because I’ve failed dismally so far to put together a “This is how I’m going do it” plan, I am referring you to the talented Steph from Saltbush Avenue.  Not only did Steph do her research and develop a great vegetable garden plan that included the most adorable illustrations, but she’s harvested her first crop and is now teasing me with photos of home grown veggies.

Have a great Easter everyone and don’t forget to leave a carrot out for the rabbit.

 

 

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Top 40 homes and gardens.

To end a month of celebrations and self indulgence, I’m sharing my Top 40 favourite pictures of homes and gardens.  I thought it would be a cinch to post my favourite pics, but it has actually taken me all month to pull this together.  I’ve included all the links to the photo sources, so if you see something you like, click a little further and you’ll often find pictures of the whole house.  When you get to the end, leave a comment to let me know which photo you like the best.

Top 5 Houses that I just keep coming back to look at:

  1. Previously rentable via One Fine Stay, this New York apartment was renovated by Athena Calderone from Eye Swoon.
  2. A little on the sparse side, but I imagine this house to be very similar to HBTW once we put timber floors in.   Somewhere between the extremes of the house above and this one is where I’d like to see HBTW’s aesthetic lie.

    Amalfi Residence by Bayden Goddard Design Architects.  Source:  Home DSGN

    Amalfi Residence by Bayden Goddard Design Architects. Source: Home DSGN.

  3. An irresistible entrance and home amongst the trees.  This house says “Australia” to me.

    Storrs Road Residence by Tim Stewart Architects.  Source:  Home DSGN.

  4. Bondi home with a beach vibe, without being obvious.  I love the splashes of blue with white and wood. The brick walls are original.

    Source:  Trends Ideas.

    5.  And, if I wasn’t starting with a new build – I’d want a warehouse, or a barn to convert.  This Amsterdam loft conversion is just the ticket:

    Picture source: Vosges Paris.

 

5 Best of the West.

For more details and pictures of all 5 of these Western Australian homes, check out one of my favourite blogs:  House Nerd.

  1. Cambuild’s “light, white, wood-filled house“.  Inside and out, I’ll take one of these, please.

    Photos by Joel Barbitta of D-MAX Photography.

    Photos by Joel Barbitta of D-MAX Photography.

  2. The “rustic modern house“:

    A new house with character.  Photos by:

    A new house with character. Photos by: Joel Barbitta at D-MAX Photography.

  3. Jeremy’s house was designed around a marri tree and some special needs.  I wish all kids with special needs could have a house like this.Jeremy's house
  4. The Old Stone Farmhouse is a piece of rural Australian history.  It’s filled with goodies old and new, many of which you can purchase on the owner’s website, Cranmore Home.

    The Old Stone Farmhouse.

    Photo by Sally Mills.

  5. House Nerd has a special radar for interesting houses.  This spacious living area was once a church.

    Photographs by Heather Robbins of Red Images Fine Photography.

    Photographs by Heather Robbins of Red Images Fine Photography.

Top 5 Kitchens from around the world.

  1. One from South Africa:

    Unrestricted by safety regulations!

    Unrestricted by safety regulations!  Source: Home Adore.

  2. Norway:
    Norwegian kitchen.

    Natural light galore and a neutral pallet. Source: Planet Deco.

    3.  France:

    Old mill kitchen.

    19th century oil mill. Source: One Kind Design.

    4.  Canada:

    Canadian kitchen.

    Old meets new in a light and homely kitchen.  Source: Sophie Burke Design.

    5.  And, the United States of America:

LA kitchen

My size kitchen bench.  Room for the whole family.  Jenni Kayne’s Los Angeles kitchen found on Architectural Digest.

Top 5 Backyards

  1. This garden by Tim Davies Landscaping belongs to the original “Rubix” display house – our house plan.
  2. There’s so much I love about this Melbourne back yard; the decking, the timber “soldiers”, the pizza oven, the brickwork, all designed around the tree.  
  3. From Punta del Este, in South America, my ideal outdoor kitchen and dining room.

  4. With similar “back yard” space to us, this Sydney yard has always stuck in my mind.  The fish pond and pool connected by a “jetty” is such a unique touch.

  5. This garden is in the U.S., but it would look equally at home in Australia.  Rust for the outback, big trees for the bush.  

5 rooms I love.

  1. Sofa ✔ timber floors ✔ single grey wall ✔ art made from material ✔.
  2. A master bedroom that manages to be light and moody all at the same time.
    Bedroom.

    Source: Lonny.

    3.  Probably any room from this house could make it onto my Top 5.  Check out the whole house, it’s full of nice surprises.  The stand outs for me are the art, the large windows and the floral additions.

    Mill house open living

    Remodelled mill house. Source: One Kind Design.

    4.  I like my light and I like my trees… you might need high fencing between neighbours for this one.  The house to which this bathroom belongs is probably not what you’d expect.

    Transparent bathroom.

    Source: Mi Casa.

    5.  A delightfully welcoming hallway:

     

    Top 5 “Australian-made” showcases

  1. Mark and Louella Tuckey’s home, filled with Mark Tuckey‘s Australian made furniture and relics from an Aussie life.

  2. Jan Juc house showing off custom made cabinetry and Aussie-made sofas.

    Source: House Awards

    Source: House Awards.

  3. This award winning Australian house was met with mixed feedback in its unfurnished state.  I think the view speaks for itself.  Here it looks modern and homely with Australian-made furniture from Domayne:Domayne Furniture.
  4. Inspired by and built into the sand dunes near 13th Beach, this house is a beautiful work of art.

  5. Have I already mentioned that I love Melbourne?  Fitzroy is the place to be.  Australia’s answer to New York’s loft conversions.  So cool.

    Source:  Home Adore.

    Source: Home Adore.

 

Top 5 “By The Water” houses

  1. My kind of beach house.  Relaxed.

    On the New South Wales Coast.  Source:  Desire to Inspire.

  2. A villa in Majorca.

    Source:  Planet Deco.

  3. Not your average display home….

    Pacific view.

    Apartment display suite at Bondi Beach. Source: SJB architects.

  4. Jaw-droppingly beautiful grounds on the Mexican coast:

    Photo source: Freshome.

  5. Somewhat extravagant, but I could do it if I had to:

    Sydney knows how to do water views.  Source:  Home Adore.

    Sydney knows how to do water views. Source: Home Adore.

Top 5 spaces for “my next life”.

  1. As a child I will grow up in this bedroom:

  2. I will, of course, be French!

    French home.

    Source: AD Design File.

  3. I will have chooks and a veggie patch large enough to be self sufficient.

    Vegetable garden

    Source: not known.

  4. And, probably a very expensive oven where I will bake ’til my heart’s content and never get fat:

    Oven

    Source: Remodelista.

  5. Then laze in my outdoor bathroom.
Outdoor bath

Source: Living.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Window Shopping

I’m not exactly sure what the builders are up to right now, but the odd little bit of “behind the scenes” information is sneaking into my inbox.  What are the soak well requirements for the pool?  Can I confirm that I want the front door stained not painted?  And, most excitingly, the names of our Construction Liaison, the “Starts Manager” (in charge of site works and slab), and Site Supervisor. Any moment now there will be a start date!

Meanwhile, I’m having a little holiday in Australia.  And as I take my job as Chief in Charge of beautifying House By The Water seriously, I plan to do a bit of retail research.  This week I’m in Sydney, hitting the shops for a couple of days with Aunty Kate.  Then, my husband and I are having a rare child-free 24 hours in Beechworth, North East Victoria.  And finally, a mini-break in Melbourne with the kids to soak up all that we love about that great city.  Food, shops, interesting architecture and a European vibe, all seen through the rose-coloured glasses of sentimentality.  (My husband and I met in Melbourne 20 years ago and lived there for several years.)

I thought I’d share my itinerary wish list with you, in case you have some recommendations for me.

Sydney:

  1. West Elm.  (Pictured top.) I’ve seen a lot of pinning action on some lovely West Elm furniture and their prices are not too shocking.  I want to see how it looks in reality.
  2. Williams and Sonoma.  When I lived in Canada I visited this paradise for home cooks regularly and was always in awe of the quality cookware.  Can the Australian store lives up to my expectations?
  3. The Society Inc..  Sibella Court’s little office in Paddington.  This lady has mastered the art of making clutter look good.  I need lessons.
  4. Zaffero Pop Up Shop.  I’ve never been to a pop up shop before, but in a world of online shopping, it’s a great idea.  If I’m going to spend a few hundred dollars on a light fixture or rug, I really want to see it first.  This way, I can look now, buy later.
  5. Matt Blatt.  The king of replicas.  Will they fool me?  I hope so.
  6. David Jones.  Australian-made towels by Country Road are currently 50% off.
  7. Adriano Zumbo.  With all that home decorating research, I’m going to need some sustenance.  Zumbo is everywhere these days (Tim Tams anyone?) but I like the tiny, original store in Balmain.

Hardly revolutionary, I know.  But don’t forget I’ve been in the depths of wild Brazil (slight exaggeration) for the past 8 months, deprived of shops tailored to Australian taste.

Beechworth:

Provenance accommodation, Beechworth.

Our accommodation at “The Provenance“, Beechworth.

On my last visit to Beechworth, 20 years ago, my highlights were sticky beesting from the Beechworth bakery and viewing the jail where the infamous bushranger, Ned Kelly, was held.  Beechworth is a gold rush town that has maintained many of its beautiful old buildings.  It’s now also a gourmet destination and I’m hoping that it will have a few cute antique and home wares stores for browsing.

Melbourne:

  1. H and M.  Trendy and cheap clothes and home wares.  I’m interested in their linen bedding and curtains.
  2. Corporate Culture.  One of the stockists for the gorgeous Coco pendant that is in top spot for contention as our dining room pendant light.  At $1500, I have to see it first.
  3. Fonda Mexican Restaurant.  The interior design of this restaurant has been a bit of a talking point, but I suspect my family will be more interested in the guacamole and margaritas.

I’d love a little more “Australian-made” on the list.  I suspect we’ll make a few discoveries as we wander the streets of Melbourne.

Do you have any favourites to share?  I won’t bore you with another shopping post, but if I find any treasures, I’ll share them on House By The Water’s Facebook page.

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Farmhouse tour.

 

Photo by Matt Rex.

Photo by Matt Rex.


Come and have a sticky beak at my Mum and Dad’s farm house in frosty North-East Victoria.  They started with a 2 bedroom shack beside a small walnut grove and a few paddocks for cows.

Ten years ago, with the help of local builder, Rob Boland, they extended the living areas and bathroom and added a bedroom, to create an interesting, light and open, modern home.  The house features 3 separate roofs and exterior wall cladding in Colorbond “ironstone” corrugated iron.

3 Roofs

Front Entrance.

Front Entrance.

Deck for cuppas.

Deck for cuppas.

Should you drop by, you can be sure of a cup of tea and some home baked goodies on the deck, followed by a garden tour.

Kitchen:

Tasmanian Oak Kitchen Island and Alpine Ash floors salvaged from bush fires.

“Tasmanian Oak” kitchen bench tops and Alpine Ash floors salvaged from bush fires.

When I’m visiting, I often take over Mum’s kitchen while she takes over supervision of the 3 little pigs.  This kitchen has been the hub for years of entertaining a large extended family and has served as my benchmark for sizing up the kitchen in House By The Water.  You might remember that this is my “gold standard” for kitchen bench size.

Living area:

An atrium above the kitchen keeps the living area light at any time of day.

An atrium above the kitchen keeps the living area light at any time of day.

Dining room:

My Dad made the dining table when Mum was pregnant with me.  That’s an estimated 14600 family dinners!  When the clouds lift, Mount Feathertop is at the centre of the dining room view.

Master bedroom:

The pitched ceiling is lined with corrugated iron which gives a nice sense of space and a farm house touch.  The bed is centred in the room so you can check on the cows in the morning without getting out of bed.

Bathroom:

Bath with a view, if the neighbours aren't home.

Bath with a view, if the neighbours aren’t home.

Laundry:

The laundry was originally a small shed, a couple of metres away from the back door of the house.  It doubles as the farm control centre, also housing the electric fence unit, chook pellets and an impressive gumboot collection.

Mum's ergonomically designed laundry trolly.  She pushes the wet laundry up the nearby hill to the old Hill's Hoist.

Mum’s ergonomically designed laundry trolly. She pushes the wet laundry up the nearby hill to the old Hill’s Hoist.

Right now the wood fire is roaring in the living room and the house is busy with grandchildren.  Toys and games are everywhere.  The kids will be outside soon to help with some farm jobs.  Dad is “up the back” renovating his tractor shed.  Mum is in the shower, but I think I’ll have another cuppa and wait for the bathroom to warm up another degree or two.

Header photo and photos in the last gallery are thanks to Matt Rex Photo.

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Cray Pot Pendants

Mandurah was originally a fishing town and it’s still a favourite past time for many locals.  Personally, I’d prefer to watch paint dry and grass grow than wait for a fish to attach itself to my rod.  However, it is fun to go “crabbing” with friends once a year, followed by chilli crabs on the BBQ.  And, I have been known to enjoy being knocked over by small waves while plucking abalone off the rocks.  For many years my husband and friends regularly dove for crayfish in the ocean.  Recent shark tales may change that, but it remains that Mandurah is a fishing destination.

Mr. Mitchell obviously has a great mind.

Mr. Mitchell obviously has a great mind.

I’m not one for dolphin-shaped water features or crab-mosaic splash backs, but a cray pot pendant?  Now we are talking.  I was keeping this idea as a surprise, but this week I noticed that someone else had the same idea!  I delved a little deeper and it turns out cray pot pendants are everywhere.

Picture Sources:  1.  Pinterest (original source not known) 2.  Homelife 3 & 4. Coastal Vintage.

So far this is my plan:

1.  Include provision for pendants on the lighting plan.  Check.

2.  Buy some cheap lights with appropriate cord length and have them installed by the builder’s electrician during construction.  (Getting to the light “sockety” things later, won’t be easy.)

3.  Remove cheap shades and add the cray pots and supporting wires/line/chain at my leisure.

Not much detail there, I know.  I have figured out that there are plenty of places that will sell you the necessary bits and pieces (eg. Ikea and Beacon Lighting in Australian, West Elm in North America).  I have 3 potential locations in mind for my cray pot pendants, all in areas with double-height, 5.4 metre ceilings.  I think I will need at least 1.8 metres of cord.  And now, what I don’t know:

  • Cray pots weigh 1-2kg.  Is that normal for a pendant?  Do you think the cray pot needs to have its own support, rather than hang from the cord?
  • One of the pendants will be in the alfresco area, in other words – it’s outside but has a roof above.  I’m worried about rust.  Has anyone put in pendant lights designed specifically to withstand coastal conditions?
  • The largest cray pots available, in the style I like, are 60cm wide, but only 30 cm high.  Maybe too small for our large spaces?

Have you made your own pendant lights?  Any tips for someone who is ever-so-slightly challenged by electrical concepts.

I’ve collected a few DIY pendant light stories in my Pinterest DIY folder.  If you are feeling creative, have a click around in there for links to instructions to make pendants such as these:

One of "50 Coolest DIY Pendant Lights" found at Decoist.

One of “50 Coolest DIY Pendant Lights” found at Decoist.

Woven rope pendant - DIY by Design Sponge.

Woven rope pendant – DIY by Design Sponge.

Most importantly, do you have any old cane or wood cray pots rotting away behind your shed?  I’m a willing buyer.

When all else fails, I have found a few cray pot fakes!  Good looking fakes, mind you, but not useful for actually catching crayfish.

Picture sources:  1.  Darcy Clark   2. Zaffero   3. Freedom.